<
  News     DIFP   Benefits Profiles Account  


forums

Recent Posts



(New threads or threads with new replies - ↑ Links to top of thread)

 PM5 Monitor Profiles
Jul 16, 2004 12:01 AM
Posted by Thomas Fors

 Changing a action
Jul 15, 2004 9:05 PM
Posted by Scott Martin

 IP quality settings
Jul 15, 2004 8:01 PM
Posted by Sergio Bartelsman

 Suggestions for Designing a Digital Studio
Jul 15, 2004 7:28 PM
Posted by David White

 Densitometer
Jul 15, 2004 5:28 PM
Posted by Richard Worley

 ACR's Calibration
Jul 15, 2004 2:17 PM
Posted by Greg Barnett

 Nikon 5000 experience???
Jul 15, 2004 12:44 PM
Posted by Francis Lépine

 Infrared Landscapes with 1Ds
Jul 15, 2004 12:10 PM
Posted by Sergio Bartelsman

 Flexcolor V3.9.1
Jul 15, 2004 11:05 AM
Posted by Mark Tomalty

 USB issues with OS X solved?
Jul 15, 2004 11:01 AM
Posted by John Vitollo

...see more posts

articles

Weekly Chatter:PS Licensing
Thursday October 9, 2003

Section 1: PS Licensing






Software > Inside Photoshop > PS Licensing


































AuthorSubject: PS Licensing  
Nick Rains
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 3:10 AM

This enquiry was sparked off by the evident general disgust at the new activation scheme for PSCS and the comments in that another thread.

Rather than wade through the legalese of the actual license for PS7, can someone tell me if it allowable ever to have a single copy of any Adobe software installed on 2 machines?

I have a home office as well as my gallery where I often work on a Sunday. I would like to be able to do some digital work when it is quiet in the gallery and I don't have a laptop powerful enough to be worthwhile for PS work.

Since I am the only USER, can I have a copy of PS on 2 distinct machines, one at home and one in my gallery office? I am hoping that as long as I am the only user, it is OK.

I have a copy of Elements for my Manager to use at the gallery for simple printing tasks - she doesn't need the power of PS. However, my attempts to work with it were limited as I need the extra facilities of PS myself.

Nick Rains


Carl Anderson
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 5:17 AM

From the PS7 license agreement:

"2.4. Portable Computer Use. The primary user of the Computer on which the Software is installed may
also make a second copy for his or her exclusive use on a portable Computer provided the Software on the
portable Computer is not being used at the same time the Software on the primary computer is being used."

There is no mention of permitted use of the software on a second desktop.


Robert Holland
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 9:39 AM

Nick,

I spoke with Adobe about this last month. I was told that I can install it on as many of MY computers as I want, assuming I only use one at a time. Networking will not work, though. Won't allow two computers with same software ID at once. Hopefully the new Photoshop will work the same way.

Robert
www.robertholland.com


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 10:19 AM

The EULA allows installation and use on two (2) computers so long as it is not concurrent use. However, there is no mechnanism by which Adobe can either determine or prevent concurrent use. Likewise there is no way that Adobe can determine whether the computers are portable or desktop. The activation scheme simply enforces the two (2) computer condition of the EULA.

The activation scheme only applies to the individual retail version for Windows.

Registration and Activation are distinct and separate. Activation is mandatory for continued use of Photoshop CS - Registration remains voluntary.

You MUST activate Photoshop CS to use it for more than the 30 day grace period otherwise it will not launch. The application does not "phone home" after activation so installing Photoshop CS on a portable hard drive is feasible; at least so long as the drive isn't defined as a temporary drive by the OS. Activation doesn't require an Internet connection and neither does continued use.






Nick Walker
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 10:53 AM

Ian

I just rang Adobe support in the UK, for the first time in several years, regarding their activation policy fo CS. Great news they are ahead of the game regarding product anouncements as I was greated with the following option, "If you are having trouble installing Photoshop 6 on the Mac please select 1". By the way when is Photoshop coming 6 coming out?


I was told the user would be supplied with two activation codes on purchase/upgrade. If both of them are used up Adobe require you to contact them to get a new activation code. I provided him with the scenario of what happens if I upgrade my computer and sell the original one, tidy tip it, or if it was stolen and requires replacement? I was informed that as long as Adobe do not suspect fowl play you will be given another activation code. We shall see.

Regards

Nick


Herbert Gibson
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 11:07 AM

There seems to be no end to the corporate greed of companies like Microsoft and Adobe. Activation is just one more example.

Every time a new virus hits, The Great and The Good are on TV tut-tuting Puritanically about the wickedness of people who burden the Great God Capitalism with nasty costs.

Meaningless, questionable but, nevertheless impressive figures (millions, billions, trillions, dollars, pounds, dinars, ....) are thrown out to the good citizens to whip them up to a suitable lynch mob frenzy against the evil witch virus writers.

Like all such pieces, your article, unfortunately, deals with Photoshop activation in isolation. If Adobe were the only user, that would be OK. However, in no time we can expect EVERY piece of software on a PC to be a temporary activation, working at the whim of an indifferent vendor who, having banked our readies, is no longer interested in us. Despite the marketing hype, folk have enough experience of software companies to know their concern doesn't extend outside the marketing spin.

So, from now on, every minor glitch on our PC is liable to disrupt EVERYTHING on it! Multiplied millions of times across the world; how inconvenient IS THAT! What will the 'cost to industry' be from this nonsense? Absolutely ENORMOUS! But it will fall on the rhesus monkeys of business. As usual, the 200 lb gorillas will ensure that they come out on the plus side.

I had a new experience today. For the first time ever, I searched the net looking for crack sites. I'm not very good at it yet and succeeded only in getting a load of cookies, data miners and other cr*p. Nevertheless, practice makes perfect. If I use PS8 I will pay for it; just like I've done for every bit of software I've ever used. But I'm NOT inclined to allow Bill Gates or Thomas Knoll to implant a chip in my brain


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 11:18 AM

Nick,

> I was informed that as long as Adobe do not suspect fowl play you will be given another activation code. We shall see.

The policy should be the same throughout the world. If you intend to carry out the initial two activations by phone then a special free phone number for each country is provided. Once you exceed the permitted number of activations you must contact your local Adobe office (again the number is provided on the activation dialog) and request an additional activation. If your explanation is satisfactory you will get an activation bump. This can occur a limited number of times within a predefined time window (6 months has been given as an example period for "each" window). I'm not at liberty to say how many bumps you can expect to get within this period but some of the figures quoted elsewhere are totally unrealistic.




Bruce Fraser
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 12:00 PM

Herbert,

Don't you think you're overreacting a bit? Wanting to get paid more than 10˘ on the dollar doesn't seem like corporate greed to me, and the activation will withstand everything short of a low-level format or a motherboard swap.

Adobe's primary responsibility is to its stockholders. If you don't like that, by all means let's get out there and smash capitalism, but that's a somewhat larger issue than software activation...


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 12:27 PM

Herbie,

>There seems to be no end to the corporate greed of companies like Microsoft and Adobe. Activation is just one more example.


Don't confuse activation with corporate greed. In the short term activation will likely result in lost sales rather than increase them. Given that it only applies to individual retail versions it will NOT make any significant impact on pirated copies emanating from sites to which you surfed. The majority of pirated copies began life as multi license versions and this means that there are in fact only a relatively small number of serial numbers in pirate hands. I doubt we'll see this form of illegal distribution being reduced. Adobe have other methods of dealing with such versions as we found with the PS7 point release.


Activation WILL reduce what has become known as casual copying. That is were groups (large and small) club together and buy a copy of photoshop only to make further copies for sharing within the group. Casual copying has become a major problem and I for one am sick to death of hearing how honest these folk claim to be.


>If I use PS8 I will pay for it; just like I've done for every bit of software I've ever used.

I've known you for 20 years plus and this is what I would expect from you. Unfortunately the tone of your post (like previous ones on the same subject) is such that others could easily form the view that you're not as honest as you make out. I KNOW this would be a BIG mistake on their part but you really are putting yourself up for a knockdown. So if you're going to vent pick on the thieving b....ds who brought this down on us.


BTW: some of the pro photographers whom we both know well are using pirate copies. I will lay good odds that you could pick them out just as easily as me. Next time you're in Calumet and see these folk ask them how honest they really are. These guys go to extreme lengths to copy protect their images yet have no qualms about swindling the system over a few hundred pounds.



Herbert Gibson
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 12:40 PM

> ..... a somewhat larger issue than software activation...

Bruce,

You're absolutely right.

Perhaps I have a crisis. I'm a couple of weeks short of my 50th birthday. When I was a teenager, I was thrilled to be living in an era of ever expanding civil liberty. Hitler had just been stopped, at no small cost to ordinary folk. The young had a vision for freedom.

What fools we were. Now, as a scrawny old cynic, I know that there will always be control freaks. Their techniques dont vary much through time.

Currently, in the UK, the Government is trying to soften us up for identity cards. They whip up hysteria against illegal immigrants to justify it. But, in a country of 55m people, we have 600,000 extra civil servants in the last few years. This lot are positively salivating about the power afforded to them by cards.

In the US, Saddam (no WMDs) Hussein was the bogey man. God know what loss of civil liberties you have suffered over that story.

And so, like other control freaks, Adobe tries to dupe their customers by whipping up antagonism against cheats. It's an old game and it doesn't fool me.

At 50, I no longer take my freedom for granted. I am ever vigilant. And I know that the Microsofts and Adobes of this world are as much of a threat as politicians; perhaps more so.

I see all this stuff as crucially important. It would be; irrespective of practical concerns. But I ask you: What are the practical implications? What will life be like for honest customers when everything stops working? I think they deserve better. As far as I am concerned, I never cheated on Adobe. They got 100pence to the British pound of my money - given the inflated prices here, that was probably 165 cents to the dollar!

(Actually, I blame the Jews. It's all their fault.)


Katrin Eismann
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 12:50 PM

Can we please leave the paranoia and anti Semitic slurs (even if in poor
jest they WAY are out of line) OFF of this forum.

On 10/1/03 13:45, "IR - Herbert Gibson" <revuemail@imagingrevue.com>
carefully wrote:

>> ..... a somewhat larger issue than software activation...
>
> Bruce,
>
> You're absolutely right.
>
> Perhaps I have a crisis. I'm a couple of weeks short of my 50th birthday. When
> I was a teenager, I was thrilled to be living in an era of ever expanding
> civil liberty. Hitler had just been stopped, at no small cost to ordinary
> folk. The young had a vision for freedom.
>
> What fools we were. Now, as a scrawny old cynic, I know that there will always
> be control freaks. Their techniques dont vary much through time.
>
> Currently, in the UK, the Government is trying to soften us up for identity
> cards. They whip up hysteria against illegal immigrants to justify it. But, in
> a country of 55m people, we have 600,000 extra civil servants in the last few
> years. This lot are positively salivating about the power afforded to them by
> cards.
>
> In the US, Saddam (no WMDs) Hussein was the bogey man. God know what loss of
> civil liberties you have suffered over that story.
>
> And so, like other control freaks, Adobe tries to dupe their customers by
> whipping up antagonism against cheats. It's an old game and it doesn't fool
> me.
>
> At 50, I no longer take my freedom for granted. I am ever vigilant. And I know
> that the Microsofts and Adobes of this world are as much of a threat as
> politicians; perhaps more so.
>
> I see all this stuff as crucially important. It would be; irrespective of
> practical concerns. But I ask you: What are the practical implications? What
> will life be like for honest customers when everything stops working? I think
> they deserve better. As far as I am concerned, I never cheated on Adobe. They
> got 100pence to the British pound of my money - given the inflated prices
> here, that was probably 165 cents to the dollar!
>
> (Actually, I blame the Jews. It's all their fault.)
> --------------------------------------------------


Andrew Rodney
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 1:00 PM

on 10/1/03 9:20 AM, IR - Ian Lyons wrote:

> You MUST activate Photoshop CS to use it for more than the 30 day grace period
> otherwise it will not launch. The application does not "phone home" after
> activation so installing Photoshop CS on a portable hard drive is feasible; at
> least so long as the drive isn't defined as a temporary drive by the OS.
> Activation doesn't require an Internet connection and neither does continued
> use.

If I'm understanding this correctly, it doesn't really seem to make this a
real problem in a pinch situation where you HAVE to run Photoshop (and you
can of course run PS7). I could make a CD that had a CS installer, then
install on say a small external FireWire drive and run in "demo"?

On the Mac, I often clone a drive (Carbon Cloner). I wonder if this would
work on a PC (or the Mac should this ever come to us)?


Herbert Gibson
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 1:14 PM

"I've known you for 20 years plus and this is what I would expect from you. Unfortunately the tone of your post (like previous ones on the same subject) is such that others could easily form the view that you're not as honest as you make out. I KNOW this would be a BIG mistake on their part but you really are putting yourself up for a knockdown."

Eh?

Thanks Ian, I don't know what you thinking here, but you're wrong. I purchased my first copy of Photoshop (5.5) from PC World in Lisburn. Then PS6 upgrade directly from Adobe. They will have the registrations. That's what I have now. Windows 98SE was purchased with computer. Still on Office 97. Perhaps I'm an EXTRA dumb sucker, but I've NEVER used unlicensed software. Any self-respecting copier wouldn't be seen dead with Win98, Office 97 and PS6! but they do the job just fine.

"BTW: some of the pro photographers whom we both know well are using pirate copies. I will lay good odds that you could pick them out just as easily as me. Next time you're in Calumet and see these folk ask them how honest they really are. These guys go to extreme lengths to copy protect their images yet have no qualms about swindling the system over a few hundred pounds."

I honestly dont know what they use. I'm surprised if they're running businesses with dodgy software, but maybe they have the nerve. However, I have worked for Venture Portraits and I can assure you that they are scrupulously straight. They have a double digital studio and use half a dozen Photoshop 6. I have seen the boss running around, frowning and counting while he considered a re-organisation.

I'm done on this subject. As I said, PS8 does the job adequately. Perhaps I'll just stick with it.


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 2:05 PM

Herbie,

>Eh?

>Thanks Ian, I don't know what you thinking here, but you're wrong. I purchased my first copy of Photoshop (5.5) from PC World in Lisburn. Then PS6 upgrade directly from Adobe.

I am NOT challenging your honesty and my apologies if that is how it appeared. However, I am concerned with the tone of your original post. As someone who paid TOP money (PC World were never cheap for anything) for your software you have a right to expect the vendors to take some action against those who are much less honest than you; yet you accuse Adobe of other motives. It seems to me that you've got this whole thing ass-about-face - Adobe are not the villains! Every time you connect to the Internet your location and surfing habits are nailed. Every time you use your mobile phone, credit card or cash machine card your personal details and location are nailed - yet I don't see you complaining about these.

Activation isn't about personal liberty it's about "trying" to stop the hoods ripping honest John and Jenny off. If you've got a better suggestion than Activation then I'm sure Adobe would love to here it.


>I'm done on this subject.


Sorry but that doesn't wash anymore. This is the second time in as many months that you've let fly over activation. Last time was on Rob Galbraith forum and Jeff Schewe tried to explain the whys and wherefores. You took offense on that occasion because you thought that he was accusing you of piracy. Nobody has accused you of anything - not me, not anybody!


Yeh and cut the crap about identity cards you and I have been carrying the things for years - let Tony, Nick, Martin, and other UK citizens fight that battle ;-) They've got more chance of winning than the anti activation lobby.



BTW: If I don't see you before it - Happy Birthday ;-)


Nick Decker
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 2:08 PM

Andrew wrote:

>>On the Mac, I often clone a drive (Carbon Cloner). I wonder if this would
work on a PC (or the Mac should this ever come to us)?

There are several PC-based counterparts to Carbon Copy Cloner for Mac. Two that I've used are Acronis TrueImage and Power Quest Drive Image. (I far prefer Acronis True Image because it actually works as advertised.) It seems to me that if you have a current image/clone of the drive that PS CS is installed on, you wouldn't have to go through reactivation if that drive failed and you had to replace it with a new one. The activation code, like serial numbers, would have been preserved as part of the clone/image.


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 2:26 PM

Nick,

So long as Photoshop CS has been installed and activated on that "particular" disk before you cloned it then all will be well.

Contrary to the views expressed here and elsewhere Adobe aren't stupid and they aren't out to screw honest folk. Cloning your disk for your own use is a legitimate and sensible form of backup. What isn't is giving or selling that copy to someone else.




Andrew Rodney
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 2:35 PM

on 10/1/03 1:10 PM, IR - Nick Decker wrote:

> It seems to me that if you have a current image/clone of the drive that PS CS
> is installed on, you wouldn't have to go through reactivation if that drive
> failed and you had to replace it with a new one. The activation code, like
> serial numbers, would have been preserved as part of the clone/image.

That's what I'm assuming and hoping for.


Nick Rains
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 4:22 PM

To recap the answer to my original post - I understand I can use PS on 2 machines as long as they are not used at the same time.

OK, thanks for the clarification.

Does this apply to all Adobe products? Do they all use the same license terms? I also use InDesign2 and GoLive6.

Regarding activation, if Adobe start to act like Microsoft then we are in for a problematic time if we change computers. I have gone outside the normal number of installs with Office ( had my laptop stolen at the same time as I upgraded my desktop). Getting Microsoft to 'allow' me to continue using software I had paid up right to use was not a task for the faint hearted.

It's all very well saying Adobe are reasonable people but they have the power to deny use of something that we have all paid for in good faith and expect to be able to continue to use regardless if whether we choose to make changes to our hardware.

What we do with our computers is entirely our own business, not theirs. With as many viruses out there as there are, it adds another layer of comlexity to this issue - I have already had to rebuild one of my PCs this year due to a virus (Norton is not infallible). The more activation codes I need the longer it takes to fix the results of some w***ker out there who likes writing malicious code.

Nick Rains


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 4:37 PM

Nick,

Just so as there is no ambiguity about what constitutes two (2) machines I've copied out the relevant parts from the NEW EULA (it being subtly different from that in PS7):

>"Permitted Number" means one (1) unless otherwise indicated under a valid licence (e.g., volume licence) granted by Adobe.

>2.1 General Use. You may install and use one copy of the Software on up to the Permitted Number of your compatible Computers; or

>2.4 Portable or Home. The primary user of the Computer on which the Software is installed may install a
second copy of the Software for his or her exclusive use on either a portable Computer or a Computer
located at his or her home, provided the Software on the portable or home Computer is not used at the same time as the Software on the primary Computer.

Note: the above information could change before Photoshop CS ships but it does reflect the info that Adobe have published elsewhere which would suggest that it is a done deal.


Steve Rosenblum
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 4:57 PM

So at the moment this only will apply to Windows versions of PS CS? Does that mean it will not apply to the Mac version when it is released?


Ian Lyons
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 5:09 PM

Steve,

Activation will NOT be required for the Mac version of Photoshop CS that Adobe anticipate shipping before the end of November. However, activation MAY be included in a future Mac version (read at least 18 months after CS ships)


Seth Resnick
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 5:25 PM

It is being done as a trial basis for the Windows version only. It will
not apply to the Mac Version with this release but most likely will in
the future.

seth


On Wednesday, October 1, 2003, at 06:00 PM, IR - Steve Rosenblum wrote:

> So at the moment this only will apply to Windows versions of PS CS?
> Does that mean it will not apply to the Mac version when it is
> released?
> --------------------------------------------------


Nick Walker
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 6:20 PM

Nick

I suffered the same problems (Microsoft XP Pro) through
poorly installed software/hardware issues on a new computer.

The Microsoft agent seemed reluctant to provide an activation code for the third time of asking. Fortunately I have not suffered any problems for the last 12 months!

If I ever get into difficulties with CS I hope Adobe at least have records available, method of payment,etc, regarding past purchases. Whilst this is not proof of a persons honesty as Adobe are not in a position to call in person and check they will have to trust some multi reactivation cases over the phone as genuine. There is no doubt they will be cheated regarding activation codes but I hope genuine users will not be frustrated by PC hardware/software issues which are out of their control. Only time will tell.

I am all for clamping down on illegal use of software and don't have a problem with acivation codes provided the system is fair and Adobe make efforts to tighten up their customer records for the purpose of aiding their customers.

Regards

Nick


Gary Smith
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 8:37 PM

Personally, I love it that software developers are getting more proactive about preventing piracy.

I am a sole proprietorship and I own all of my software. It makes me crazy to travel around and find corporations with deep pockets using bootlegged software. IT personnel often successfully use access to pirated software as a carrot-on-a-stick to get hired. Just as I pay for my own medical insurance I take pride in owning my software assets. I get a little crazy when I see people using software on a daily basis to generate income but are unwilling to compensate the developers of that very product.

It will be interesting to see whether I prefer dongles or these new activation schemes.

Now on to the technical issues.

Lately I have been coming across OS X systems that are a complete mess, configured by artists or Windows IT staff. I just format & partition the drives and start from scratch. Will this cause issues with CS (or Quark) activation?

How difficult will it be to move a copy from one primary Mac to a newly acquired Mac. I will have CS installed on my QuickSilver and PowerBook. When I retire my QuickSilver and get a new G5 next year, what is the procedure for moving CS to the new G5?


Gary Smith
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 8:42 PM

Now I just made a trip over to Adobe's Photoshop Mac forum. Word over there is only the Windows version has activation. Is this correct?


Gervaise Davis
Posted on Wed Oct 1, 2003 10:56 PM

Yes, that is what it expressly says on the Adobe site discussing Activation - only on Windows versions - FOR NOW.


Andrew Rodney
Posted on Thu Oct 2, 2003 8:35 AM

on 10/1/03 7:45 PM, IR - Gary Smith wrote:

> Now I just made a trip over to Adobe's Photoshop Mac forum. Word over there is
> only the Windows version has activation. Is this correct?

That is correct.


Robert W Peterson
Posted on Thu Oct 2, 2003 9:28 AM

> How difficult will it be to move a copy from one primary Mac to a newly acquired Mac. I will have CS installed on my QuickSilver and PowerBook. When I retire my QuickSilver and get a new G5 next year, what is the procedure for moving CS to the new G5?

I experienced a better activation design when working with Rational Software's Rose product. Rational implemented an activation scheme several years ago, so Adobe, et al, could have (should have) seen what I consider a better example than what they've implemented.

Activating an installation of Rose requires contacting a Rational license key Web site to obtain a key. The user must log on to the licensing Web site using information provided on paper with the purchased software. When the license server provides the key, which is delivered as a file, the license server records the identity of the machine holding the license and decrements the number of available concurrent installations. The key is specific to the machine it is issued for, but can be backed up and restored. The key information is not stored in the Windows registry.

To "unlicense" a machine, the license server Web site is again contacted, but this time to return the previously obtained key. Once the key is returned, the installation ceases to launch. The returned key is now available for assignment to a different installation of Rose.

I liked and appreciated the ability to manage authorization using an entirely automated system. The only human intervention required was when we lost a key file due to a drive crash. An email to Rational's support address explaining the situation resulted in a license server update marking the key as available.

While not perfect, the automation implemented by Rational enables the customer to manage installation authorization during system change outs, drive upgrades, system reinstallations, and other changes that can be anticipated. Handling unexpected events is no worse than the schemes Microsoft, Intiut, Phase One, and, apparently, Adobe designed and implemented.

Bob


Herbert Gibson
Posted on Thu Oct 2, 2003 9:42 AM

" ... Microsoft, Intiut, Phase One, and, apparently, Adobe ...

It's interesting that Intuit has withdrawn it's activation scheme:

http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,1088341,00.asp


Thomas Fors
Posted on Thu Oct 2, 2003 11:41 AM

I'd prefer a microchip implanted in my forehead that would allow me to use any of the software I own (err. I mean license) on any computer I use.

Just kidding.

I'm not pleased about the activation scheme, but I'll have to live with it since I'm looking forward to the new enhancements made to PS CS and will be making the upgrade.

I do hope that this means adobe gets some of the money back that they're losing from pirating and is able to lower the price of PS in the future. I really doubt though that we will ever see the price drop even if their activation scheme is successful and doubles or triples their revenue from PS.

Realistically though, I have to say I agree with the speculation that the activation will probably be cracked by hackers and ultimately not be as successful as adobe hopes. Infact, it will probably end up costing them more to man the phone lines and support on their end to provide activation codes to the legitimate customers and drive the price of PS up further.

In the end, the legitimate customers will continue paying. The pirates will continue pirating, and adobe will continue making money.


Greg Heins
Posted on Fri Oct 3, 2003 9:39 AM

Realistically, if you were thinking about buying a new computer sometime soon, you'd be foolish to buy CS to run on any computer you're thinking about replacing. Given the fact that most photographers are usually "thinking" about buying a new computer within say, six months to a year, I wonder how this will impact CS sales when the activation scenario becomes generally known. It seems to me that one would put both purchases off until they can be afforded simultaneously. Fortunately for G5 sales, this isn't yet on the Mac platform.





Other Sections Available if you login:
calendar

July 2004
S M T W T F S
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11
12
13
14
15
16 17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28 29 30
31
August 2004
S M T W T F S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29 30 31        
 

Upcoming Events


...see more upcoming events

imagingrevue Members receive special discounts on most events listed in calendar

  


Copyright ©2002-2003
Imaging Revue and Virtuaserve Inc. Online Media Division
Privacy Policy
Terms of Service