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Photoshop CS Add Ons From Al Ward.
Monday November 15, 2004
by Al Ward

Al Ward has provided Imaging Revue with Phtoshop CS styles to download. These files are in a zip format and can be opened using both Stuffit and WinZip. For more information about Al please visit www.actionfx.com. Please stay tuned for a future discount for IR members to Al's site.

Profile FAQ And Instruction Manual
Sunday October 31, 2004
by IR Staff

We have compiled a new and up to date Profile FAQ. If you are ordering a printer profile, please make sure that you read the information contained here. Many of the questions you may have will be answered here. These articles are in PDF format.

Patching and Healing with Martin Evening.
Friday October 22, 2004
by Martin Evening

The third in a series of tutorials, Martin discusses the Healing Brush and Patch Tool. Martin's video tutorial accompanies this PDF and can be uncompressed using WinZip or the Stuffit expander. Published with permission of Focal Press Publishers, a division of Elsevier. Copyright 2004. For more information about this book and other Focal Press titles, please visit www.focalpress.com.

Nikon Scanning Workflow
Friday October 15, 2004
by Scott Martin

Scott Martin has deciphered Nikon's workflow technology and brings us this quick guide to achieving great scans. For more information on Scott and his work, please visit www.on-sight.com.

Image Adjustments with Martin Evening.
Friday October 8, 2004
by Martin Evening

The second in a series of tutorials, Martin discusses the Photo Filter and Color Temperature. Martin's video tutorial accompanies this PDF and can be uncompressed using WinZip or the Stuffit expander. Published with permission of Focal Press Publishers, a division of Elsevier. Copyright 2004. For more information about this book and other Focal Press titles, please visit www.focalpress.com.

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Printers > Fine Art/Photographic Printing > about rendering intents

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AuthorSubject: about rendering intents   [Go to Bottom of Page]
Jeff Schewe
Posted on Mon Jul 14, 2003 12:04 AM

Howard Cubell, in a different thread (about Andrew's softproofing article) posted this:

On 7/13/03 9:10 PM, "IR - Howard Cubell" wrote:

> Consistent with Bruce and Andrew's advice that you can softproof AND print out
> of the driver with the Atkinson profile using Rel. Col. as the rendering
> intent rather than Perceptual, the main man himself, Sir Atkinson, has
> suggested that some images may in fact print better with his profiles with
> Rel. Col. rather than Perceptual, though the implication is that most will
> work best with Perceptual.

I was just skimming Andrew's article and I think it would be useful to explain rendering intents a bit. . .so I strated a new thread.

If the output devise gamut (profile) is incapable or reproducing the entire gamut of colors contained in the original, you are faced with a dilemma-do you try to compress all the colors that are outside of the printer's gamut or, do you basically cut them off?

Perceptual Rendering attempts to compress all of the out of gamut colors to get them into gamut-but, something's gotta give and usually it's the luminosity of the image. . .deep saturated colors get lighter. While the preceptual rendering compression tries (and does a fairly good job of it too) is to maintain the "perceptual relationship" at the expense of the tonality.

The Relative Colormetric basically takes those colors well outside of the output gamut and chops them off. However, this is NOT as violent and nasty as you might think. A lot of the colors that output devices CAN'T print are colors that may not really be all that important. The GOOD thing about Relative Colormetric is that if the colors ARE capable of being printed, RelCol WON'T change them. . .and. . .RelCol tends to maintain the luminosity of the original images better than Precep.

So. . .when should you use one over the other? The flip answer is to use the one that "looks best" when you softproof it-and this really is true. Arguably the most important purpose of softproofing is to determine which rendering intent is best for any given image. . .

On the other hand, I've learned that you can pretty much tell which rendering intent will be better based upon a few criteria. . .for example, if an image contains a LOT of highly saturated colors and needs to maintain the color relationships, Perceptual will probably be the best. Imaging a red rose. . .with a lot of saturated red color but also a lot of textural detail. In order to maintain that textural detail. . .the deep reds and the very light red, you need to compress all the colors. This will help keep the texture intact. . .areas of the red rose WILL get lighter. . .but you'll still be able to see textural detail. RelCol would probably loose a lot of textural red detail because it will clip the detail information out.

On the opposite, image a shot where the tonal values of an image are critical. If you wish to maintain the luminosity values you'll have to sacrifice the color info. So, image you wish to print a monochromatic high key image. . .which rendering intent should you use? Well, the one that looks best (sorry, had to throw that in), but check out RelCol first cause the odds are real good that's what will be best.

The simple fact is that in real life, many images will actually look better under RelCol because as photographers, while colors are important, many times it's the luminosity and gradations - "the light" in an image that thrills us.

By way of explanation of why Bill tends towards Perceptual vs RelCol, if you know Bill's work, it's all about color. So naturally he gravitates towards something that will maintain the color relationships. However, many photographers shoot subjects where color is not the primary aesthetic-tonal values are.

The final point. . .and the reason why Andrew, Bruce and I are such strong proponents of softproofing, is that as visual artists, it's important to be able to "see" what your image WILL look like prior to printing so you can make those judgements about tone, color and rendering intent. That is the real power of softproofing. . .and the absolute power and control it gives YOU. . .

So. . .the bottom line is if "Color" is the most important aesthetic in an image. . .go Preceptual, if "Luminosity" is the most important aesthetic go Relative Colormentric. But see for yourself while softproofing!



Jeff Schewe
www.schewephoto.com - www.pixelgenius.com - www.imagingrevue.com




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