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ImagePrint 6 Notes
Thursday September 2, 2004
by Mitch Alland

I am pleased to see that the new ImagePrint manual for v6 is a great improvement over earlier versions and is, in fact, excellent. The extensive Troubleshooting Guide section is a good addition. Also, as program installation has been simplified, I believe that most questions on IP problems that come up on online forums can now be answered by suggesting, in the best Unix tradition, that the user "look it up in the manual...." These notes are based on ImagePrint 6 build 1.08. If you are using a later build some of the issues and glitches discussed below may have been fixed, as ColorByte is aware of all of them.

Weekly Chatter:Canon i9900 Profile
Monday August 30, 2004
by Imaging Revue Experts and Staff

Each and every week, Imaging Revue offers non-members a tantalizing taste of the information available in our forums. Make sure to check out the entire list.

ImagePrint 5.6 Notes
Saturday August 28, 2004
by Mitch Alland

"Based on my experience in setting up the Mac OSX version of ImagePrint, Iíve compiled these notes in the hope that they will be helpful to new users of both the Mac and Windows versions of the software. "

Weekly Chatter:What does increased bit depth and better color actually give to the end result as printed?
Tuesday August 24, 2004
by Imaging Revue Experts and Staff

Each and every week, Imaging Revue offers non-members a tantalizing taste of the information available in our forums. Make sure to check out the entire list.

(R)Evolution II: Color - A New Zone System?
Thursday August 19, 2004
by John Paul Caponigro

Call it revolutionary or evolutionary, the digital advances made in color photography are nothing short of amazing. In photography, we now have independent control of color?s three primary qualities: hue, or the spectrum of colors around the color wheel (red through yellow, green, blue, cyan, magenta and back to red); saturation, the gradient from intense to dull; and brightness, the gradient from dark to light.

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Color Management/WorkFlow > Workflow > How deep should we go?

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AuthorSubject: How deep should we go?   [Go to Bottom of Page]
Allan Shiffrin
Posted on Sun Aug 3, 2003 11:42 AM

A recent purchase of a canon 10d (mostly for personal use) has led me to all of the excellent color discussions going on (especially IR). As a result, I have become totally obsessed with color accuracy, again. I realize I need a goal. Otherwise I'm afraid they'll lock me up in a small neutral gray room. ;)

I am very intrigued by so many posts claiming exact match of monitor and print. There is no question that achieving that would allow us to create a more efficient and better workflow.

We have generally relied on the numbers to get results (usually cmyk, we are in the business of designing, photographing and producing upscale catalogs). We have achieved excellent results from our digital backs and using an epson 10000 with a Best Color rip to provide digital contract proofs along with pdf or scitex ctlw files to the various printers that manufacture the catalogs.

However, we have accepted that our monitors (while calibrated) can not be relied on. Ultimately, we have focused on making our proofs match as closely to our printers proofs as possible and we make all final color judgements based on our proofs. While this strategy will never completely go away (because the contract proof is ultimately what the pressman is going to match and also what our art director doing the press ok is going to rely on as well), we would certainly work more efficiently if we could rely more on our monitors.

So, before I go much deeper down this path I'm trying to understand how good this stuff really is and to align my expectations.

Here are some of my questions:

I don't believe I've ever seen a perfect match. In my experience there has always been some level of compromise, and I can accept that, or should I?

The best monitor I currently own is a Lacie 22". Would getting a Sony Artisan make a significant difference? (from what I've been reading, I'm gathering it would) How would you rate each of these monitors in accuracy on a scale of 1-10? Also, what should the expected life of a Sony Artisan monitor be - 1-2 yrs?, 3-5yrs?, 5+yrs?

If my goal is to achieve the best possible match of printer and monitor. Does it make sense to start with a profiled printer and use it as the standard that the monitor should match. It seems like there are more variables in the monitor profiles than the printer profiles. But how can you be sure that your print is accurate, is there a way to independantly test it against some standard? Or can you reprint a test chart with a profile and measure that result?

I look forward to your thoughts.
Allan


... this thread contains expert advice from Andrew Rodney, Jeff Schewe and Bruce Fraser.




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