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Proper Lighting Conditions
Thanks to GTI, this PDF shows some common specifications that are included in the ISO 3664:2000 guidelines.

Thursday December 18, 2003
by GTI Graphic Technology, inc.

A lot of discussion on proper lighting and environmental conditions in the digital darkroom have been discussed. Here is a PDF from GTI, the makers of excellent light boxes. It does provide some information from the ISO 3664:2000 standard.

Weekly Chatter:Need for Correct Exposure in RAW
Wednesday November 26, 2003
by weekly chatter

Each and every week, Imaging Revue offers non-members a tantalizing taste of the information available within our forums. Make sure to check out the entire list!

Soft Proof Tutorial by John Paul Caponigro
Monday November 24, 2003
by John Paul Caponigro

John Paul Caponigro walks the reader through the processes of soft proofing images in Photoshop in this elegant and useful PDF excerpt from his book "Photoshop Master Class". orders placed through John Paul at info@johnpaulcaponigroarts.com receive a free PDF Guide to Getting Good Color.

Weekly Chatter:Photoshop CS - Print with Preview settings
Thursday November 20, 2003
by Imaging Revue Experts and Members

Each and every week, Imaging Revue offers non-members a tantalizing taste of the information available within our forums. Make sure to check out the entire list!

Greg Gorman's B&W; conversion technique
Tuesday November 18, 2003
by Greg Gorman

Greg Gorman shares with the Imaging Revue subscribers, a technique that finally allows him to shoot color and still get the B&W; effect he desires. Designed by his retoucher Rob Carr, this step-by-step tutorial will show you a great new way to not only convert color to B&W; but add color toning as well! Please refer to the forum thread that got this discussion started.

...see more articles(many more!)

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Color Management/WorkFlow > Hardware and Software > EyeOne Display - Calibrating a LCD Flat Panel Monitor - No brilliant reds!

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AuthorSubject: EyeOne Display - Calibrating a LCD Flat Panel Monitor - No brilliant reds!   [Go to Bottom of Page]
Gary Davidson
Posted on Mon Sep 1, 2003 8:26 PM

See : i1 Display and white point thread

I just purchased a Samsung LCD 213T 21.3" flat panel monitor. When I first ran the OSD features for this monitor, I was surprised to learn that when you use a DVI connection from the LCD to the video board, Samsung limits you to ONLY OSD adjustment control for Brightness. In VGA connection mode, Samsung gives you full OSD adjustment control for Brightness, Contrast, Red, Green and Blue. Checking with ViewSonic technical support, I learned that their VP211b 21.3" LCD monitor has full OSD adjustment control in both VGA and DVI connection modes.

If you have or plan to purchased a LCD monitor from Samsung, you should probably consider purchasing a DVI-I to VGA adapter [$5 to $10]. This adapter would allow you to connect a VGA cable between your Samsung LCD monitor and with the adapter, connect the monitor to a DVI port on your video card. I have not noticed any image quality differences between the DVI connection and the VGA connection. By using the DVI-I to VGA adapter, you will then have full OSD adjustment control for your Samsung LCD monitor.

With the Samsung LCD monitor connected via the VGA connection, I proceeded to calibrate the LCD monitor with the EyeOne Display V2.0.3 software and corresponding hardware. I selected advanced mode and informed the software that I was calibrating a LCD monitor with full RGB adjustment capability. When the calibration was completed, I was extremely surprised that the EyeOne Display software did not request setting contrast to 100% and it did not measure different brightness levels before settling on an ideal brightness level for the OSD. The software only asked the user to select a color temperature [e.g. 6500K] and then allowed a fine adjustment of the R, G and B for an ideal match.

So, what is the deal on calibrating a LCD monitor with the EyeOne Display? Why is contrast not forced to be 100% or any other value? Why was brightness not measured and calibrated? The default set by Samsung is 50% on contrast and 80% on brightness. Should I be manually adjusting contrast and brightness, and if so, what should be the basis for such an adjustment?

It was interesting to see how perfect and steady the match was after adjusting to R=57%, G=50% and B=48% for a color temperature of 6500K on my Samsung LCD monitor. When I compared the calibrated LCD monitor to a known Print Test from Imaging Revue, I was disappointed to see that "reds" on the LCD screen lacked depth, and were not snappy or vivid or brilliant, as I observed on a CRT monitor. I tried calibrating a color temperature of 5000K, but it was hopeless to adjust enough red into the calibration process to obtain a match, and blue was also way out, in the opposite direction.

So, does anyone think I can achieve better "reds" if I tried a color temperature of 5500K on a LCD monitor, or is the word that I heard from a Princeton Graphics tech support person that "reds" are simply not vivid like those on a CRT?

This could be a serious issue for photographers because the majority of manufacturers of monitors have switched production lines 100% to LCDs and have stopped making CRTs.

Gary Davidson


... this thread contains expert advice from Andrew Rodney.




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