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File Information in Photoshop
Thursday July 3, 2003
by Seth Resnick

Digital business expert Seth Resnick discusses the protection of your work, and how Photoshop takes the pain out of the process.

From the Desk of the Photoshop Diva - Week Four: Where's the detail?
Tuesday July 1, 2003
by Katrin Eismann

Exclusive excerpts from the 2nd edition of "Photoshop Restoration & Retouching" by Katrin Eismann (ISBN# 0735713502, release date July 2003). This informative series provides weekly installments from the photoshop diva herself! Make sure to check in every Tuesday for an exciting new tip!

Black is Back: Sony's Artisan display system raises the bar
Wednesday June 25, 2003
by Andrew Rodney

Andrew Rodney recently tested the Sony Artisan, and he liked what he saw...

From the Desk of the Photoshop Diva - Week Three: Making Auto Levels work for you
Tuesday June 24, 2003
by Katrin Eismann

Exclusive excerpts from the 2nd edition of "Photoshop Restoration & Retouching" by Katrin Eismann (ISBN# 0735713502, release date July 2003). This informative series provides weekly installments from the photoshop diva herself! Make sure to check in every Tuesday for an exciting new tip!

Excerpt from Real World Color Management, co-written by Pixel Genius Bruce Fraser
Monday June 23, 2003
by Bruce Fraser

Excerpt from "Real World Color Management," a new book co-written by Pixel Genius Bruce Fraser! These pages give you an indication of what to expect from the highly-anticipated new offering from Peachpit Press! * Fraser/Bunting/Murphy, REAL WORLD COLOR MANAGEMENT, excerpts from pp. 16-36, (c) 2003 Bruce Fraser, Chris Murphy, and Fred Bunting Reproduced by permission of Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Peachpit Press. All rights reserved.

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Site Related > Profile Support > Profile FAQ

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AuthorSubject: Profile FAQ   [Back to Topic]
Andrew Rodney
Posted on Tue Jun 10, 2003 1:43 AM

Q: Where do my profiles get installed?

    Depends on the operating system you are using but be sure that after you download the profile that you decompress the file. Certain browsers and service providers can alter the files, so be sure to confirm that the file is not corrupt.

    Here are the appropriate applications to decompress the files If you do not already have them:

    Macintosh - Stuffit Expander - http://www.stuffit.com/mac/expander/download.html
    Windows/PC - Winzip - http://download.winzip.com/winzip81.exe

    Macintosh Running OS 9

    You can simply drag and drop the uncompressed profile over your System Folder and it will automatically be placed in the ColorSync folder. Note that if you do NOT get a message that the ICC profile is automatically being placed in the correct location, you may not have uncompressed the file correctly. You can also just open the System Folder and place the profile in the ColorSync folder. No need to restart.

    Macintosh Running OS X

    There are two locations where profiles can be placed and it does not matter which you choose. We would suggest you place them here:

    /Users/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/

    Windows

    On Windows 98 the correct path is Windows/System/Color Directory

    On Windows 2000 and XP the path is WinNT/System/Spool/Drivers/Color Directory

    For more information about color management in Windows, visit:
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/tech/color/default.mspx

Q: I'm working on a PC and you built the profile on a Macintosh. Is this a problem?

    No, not at all. Notice that we have placed the .icm extension on all profiles we build so your PC will know what to do with the file. No extension is needed under Mac OS 9, but it does not hurt to have it there.

Q: The name of the profile you built isn't what I want. I changed the name but it is not showing up for some reason.

    Profiles have two sets of names; Internal and External. The name you see (and are changing) is the External name but most software products (including Photoshop) use the internal name when displaying the profile in a list. There are number of utilities that can do this name change for you depending on what platform you are running.


Q: The profile you sent is a very large file and all my other profiles are much smaller, why?

    When building a profile, we have the ability to sue more data points in the profile for better quality and that is why the profiles are so large.


Q: What is the best way to test my new profile?

    Use a file that has good, known color to run a test. We suggest you download the Printer Test file from Profiles page.

    The files is in "Colormatch RGB" which is fine for testing the quality of the output profile. It has "memory colors" (skin, blue sky and more importantly our dog "Tosh"). use this file to evaluate the quality of the profile or if you have issues with color and need to discuss them with us. Since we have output this file thousands of times, its best used to discuss issues you may have.


Q: The print made using the profile does not match my display?

    There are several factor to keep in mind. First, use the "Printer Test File" referenced above for testing so we know the issue isn't in the file itself. Next, be sure your display is calibrated using some kind of hardware device and that Photoshop is actually seeing this profile for preview! Go into Photoshop's Color Settings and click on the Pop-down menu for RGB working space. Towards the top you should see a listing that says "Monitor RGB:XXXX" where XXXX is the name of your profile. If your custom display profile isn't being shown here, you need to investigate why. Try profiling the display again.

    In Addition, it is critical to view the print under a D50 lightbox! Holding the print up to a window isn't going to cut it! the entire CMS assumes that the display is calibrated (we suggest a white point of 6500K) and that prints are viewed under a D50 lightbox (preferably with a dimmer.)

    In addition, you must setup a soft proof in Photoshop using the custom profile you just downloaded. Just viewing the file in the RGB working space is not going to preview the image for your output device. There is a tutorial in the article section as a PDF that explains how to use the Custom Proof Setup in Photoshop.

    One last thing...be aware that a transmissive display and a reflective print will NEVER match 100%. They should however be in the high 90% range when the display is accurately calibrated and profiled and when the print is correctly viewed. Ambient light in the viewing area is also critical


... this thread contains expert advice from Andrew Rodney.

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